The outer archipelago

It was the last day. Again, we woke to the sight of water inside the tent – and again it was Vlado that had it worse. He was sitting in his sleeping bag on his sleeping mat like an island in a lake. But he had decided to leave the same morning so in that perspective it was not so bad. Kira stayed in the camp, as she had been feeling a bit off.

After saying goodbye, we left the camp with a light load as we were only going out for a day trip. Lunch, water, maps, compass and gps. Yet again it was a gray day with both rain and wind. Nikolaj asked if I wanted to be navigator, but since I had no experience and no means with which to navigate, we agreed that I would instead borrow a map and a compass and get a free crash course in navigation.

Käringön

We took a snack break in Käringön. This time there was no “kayaks welcome” sign, no pontoon and no staircase, so we stayed in our kayaks. We left the harbour and continued towards two small islands marking the outer archipelago. We wanted to get a view of the Skagerrak/Kattegat sea.

I must admit that I was a bit out of my comfort zone. The waves were high but long. They lifted the kayaks slowly – first up and then down – before crashing into the rocky cliffs with a big splash. A large, white cairn was build on the top of one of the islands, as a navigation aid and a warning to passing ships. The current between the two islands was strong when we paddled back, and as soon as we turned the corner, the waves calmed down. However, the wind now got worse and it was time to eat lunch.

Private shelter for one

We found a nice spot on an island with some shelter behind a primitive stone wall. It started raining as we unpacked the food. The tour leader was the only one who didn’t seem to care that much.We found a nice spot on an island with some shelter behind a primitive stone wall. It started raining as we unpacked the food. The tour leader was the only one who didn’t seem to care that much.

Back at the campsite, we quickly put the kayaks on the trailer. After five days of extremely wet, cold and windy summer weather, it was quite ironic how the sun appeared just as we reached the ferry.